Category: Recruiting

Understanding “Quiet Quitting” and Strategies to Address and Prevent It

woman bored at work

woman bored at work

In the realm of human resources, employee turnover is a constant challenge for organizations. However, what if we told you that some employees are quietly disengaging and planning their exit long before their resignation? This phenomenon, known as “quiet quitting,” can have a detrimental impact on productivity, morale, and overall organizational success. At TripleTrack, we aim to raise awareness about quiet quitting, guide on addressing the issue, and share proactive strategies to prevent it from happening in the first place.

What is Quiet Quitting?

Quiet quitting refers to the gradual disengagement and emotional detachment of employees who have mentally checked out from their roles, but continue to physically show up at work. These employees may appear to be doing their job but are no longer motivated or committed to their work, team, or the organization as a whole. This silent disengagement often leads to decreased productivity, increased absenteeism, and a negative impact on the workplace culture.

Addressing Quiet Quitting

Encourage Open Communication

Create a culture of psychological safety that encourages employees to voice their concerns, ideas, and frustrations. Regularly check in with employees through one-on-one meetings or employee surveys to gain insights into their experiences and identify potential signs of disengagement.

Provide Feedback and Recognition

Regular and constructive feedback is crucial for employee growth and motivation. Recognize and appreciate employees’ contributions, celebrate their achievements, and provide specific feedback to help them improve their performance. This fosters a sense of value and belonging, reducing the likelihood of quiet quitting.

Invest in Development

Employees are more likely to remain engaged and committed when they see opportunities for growth and advancement within the organization. Implement training and development programs that enhance employees’ skills and provide a clear career progression path. This investment demonstrates your commitment to their professional growth and encourages loyalty.

Preventing Quiet Quitting

Build a Positive Work Environment

Create a supportive and positive workplace culture that values open communication, collaboration, and work-life balance. Foster a sense of community through team-building activities, social events, and enterprises that promote employee well-being. A positive work environment can help prevent disengagement and make employees feel more connected to the organization.

Provide Meaningful Work

Ensure employees understand how their contributions align with the organization’s mission and purpose. When employees find their work meaningful and connected to a larger goal, they are more likely to remain engaged and committed.

Promote Work-Life Balance

Help employees achieve a healthy work-life balance by offering flexible work arrangements, recognizing the importance of personal time, and providing resources for managing stress. By prioritizing well-being, you create an environment that fosters engagement and reduces the likelihood of quiet quitting.

Quiet quitting is a stealthy threat that can erode productivity and damage workplace culture. At TripleTrack, we urge organizations to be vigilant in detecting signs of disengagement and take proactive steps to address and prevent quiet quitting. By prioritizing employee engagement and well-being, you can foster a committed and motivated workforce, leading to sustained organizational success and retention of top talent. Together, let’s create a work environment where employees feel valued, supported, and motivated to give their best every day.

The Importance of Employee Retention in Today’s Competitive Workplace

smiling employee

Employee retention has emerged as a critical concern for organizations in today’s competitive business environment. With a growing emphasis on attracting and retaining top talent, companies are realizing that employee retention not only fosters a positive work culture but also contributes to long-term success.

smiling employee

Benefits of Employee Retention

We’ll explore the significance of employee retention, its benefits, and strategies that organizations can adopt to ensure a motivated and loyal workforce.

Enhanced Organizational Stability

Employee retention provides organizations with stability, minimizing disruptions caused by frequent turnover. Retaining experienced employees allows companies to maintain a consistent level of productivity and reduces the costs associated with recruitment, training, and onboarding new staff members.

Increased Employee Engagement and Productivity

When employees feel valued and appreciated, they are more engaged and motivated to perform at their best. Organizations that prioritize employee commitment foster a positive work environment, encourage open communication, and provide growth opportunities, leading to increased productivity and efficiency.

Knowledge Retention and Organizational Memory

Long-term employees possess valuable institutional knowledge and experience that are crucial for organizational success. By retaining these employees, companies can preserve their institutional memory and ensure the smooth transfer of knowledge to new employees, avoiding the loss of critical expertise.

Cost Savings

High turnover rates can be expensive for businesses. The cost of recruiting, hiring, and training new employees can significantly impact an organization’s bottom line. By investing in employee retention strategies such as competitive compensation, professional development, and work-life balance initiatives, companies can save on recruitment costs and improve overall financial stability.

Employee retention plays a vital role in today’s competitive workplace. By fostering a positive work culture, organizations can create an environment where employees feel valued, engaged, and motivated to contribute their best efforts.  It leads to enhanced stability, increased productivity, knowledge retention, and substantial cost savings. As businesses continue to recognize the significance of a loyal and committed workforce, investing in retention strategies becomes a strategic imperative for long-term success.

Are you struggling to retain employees? Triple Track HR can help. Please contact us today to get started.

How to Upgrade Your Referral Program

three employees happy and celebrating together

three employees happy and celebrating together
By Jeff Wach, SPHR, SHRM-SCP

BUILDING AN EFFECTIVE REFERRAL PROGRAM

 

Does your company have a referral program for new hires?

Does anyone know about it?

Is it being used?

Referrals are by far the preferred source of new hires. Your employees know the culture. They know who will be a good fit. However, having a referral program isn’t enough. It has to be effective, and people need to know about it! How do you do that?

Follow the VIP Referral Program.

V = VALUED

First, the program needs to be VALUED. A $20 gift card is not going to cut it. Think hundreds. Or thousands! How much would you normally spend to recruit a quality employee? How much is a headhunter fee? Why not give that money to your employees? A referral program needs to be worth the effort. Use it as another benefit and incentive. And don’t be afraid to increase the amount for more difficult, hard-to-find positions.

I = INCREMENTAL

Second, your program needs to be INCREMENTAL. You want to reward quality and longevity, not just new hires. Consider starting with $100 upon hiring and $400 after 6 months of employment. Maybe another $500 at the end of a year. Get creative.

P = PUBLIC

Third, to get the most bang for your buck, it should be given in PUBLIC. If possible, IN CASH. I know, the accountants will want it in a check or just added to the person’s paycheck. But that misses the opportunity to communicate and advertise. No one reads. No one pays attention to the hundreds of emails HR has sent out to explain your referral bonus in the past.

Try something different. At a company-wide meeting, after introducing everyone to the new employee, call up the person who referred them and pay out the bonus IN CASH right there in front of the whole team! I guarantee you will get people’s attention! Make it clear to everyone that the program actually pays.

There you have it. The VIP Referral Program. Valued, Incremental, and Public.

How does your program measure up? Contact us today to set up a proper referral program.

How to Start a VIP Referral Program

referrals

referrals

By Jeff Wach, SPHR, SHRM-SCP

Building an Effective Referral Program

Does your company have a referral program for new hires?

Referrals are by far the preferred source of new hires. Your employees know the culture. They know who will be a good fit. However, having a referral program isn’t enough. It has to be effective. How do you do that?

Follow the VIP Referral Program.

Valued

First, the program needs to be VALUED. A $20 gift card will not get the results you are looking for. Think of the money you would normally spend to recruit a quality employee. A referral program needs to be worth the effort. Don’t be afraid of increasing the amount for more difficult, hard-to-find positions.

Incremental

Second, your program needs to be INCREMENTAL. You want to reward longevity! So perhaps give $100 when they start and $400 after 6 months of employment.

Public

Third, to get the most bang for your buck, it should be given in PUBLIC. At one of your company-wide meetings, call the person up and pay out the bonus (preferably in cash) right there in front of everyone! Make it clear to everyone that the program actually pays!

There you have it. The VIP Referral ProgramValuedIncremental, and Public.

How does your program measure up? Contact us today to set up a proper referral program.

How Recruiting Employees is Like Buying a Car

blue car in the street

blue car in the street

By Jeff Wach, SPHR, SHRM-SCP

KPIs and Job Descriptions

I’ve talked about bringing Key Performance Indicators (KPI) from a job description to the beginning of the recruiting process. Why the beginning?

In “Alice in Wonderland”, Alice receives some unusual but wise advice from the Cheshire Cat: “If you don’t know where you are going any road can take you there”. Likewise, if you don’t define success in a given role, then any candidate can fill it.

How Recruitment is like Buying a Car

To illustrate how KPI works….

Think back to the last car you bought. You had a list of needs and wants. You also had performance expectations, or KPI, in mind. Things like speed, handling, towing capacity, or gas mileage.

For example, if towing capacity was on your list, you might look for a pick-up truck. But if gas mileage was important, you would need something a bit smaller. So let’s say MPG is going to be your KPI. But that’s not enough. You also need a minimum level of performance to look for. The KPI is how we measure, but we need an acceptable minimum. A passing grade.

You do your calculations and determine that 25 MPG is your minimum standard. Great! Let’s go shopping! You find a car and ask the dealer what the MPG is. And he says “I dunno.” “What?” you say.

“Well, it should be able to get about 25 MPG.” Replies the dealer. “What do you mean should?” you reply. “Well, based on the size of the engine and the weight of the car, it should be able to get about 25 MPG. Why? What’s the problem?”

Would you buy that car? Of course not! Who would spend $20,000 or $30,000 on something that should perform? But that is exactly what we do every time we hire someone based solely on a resume. You see – the resume tells us they should be able to do the job. It tells us if they have the potential to be successful. But how many people are let go that should have been able to succeed? People that should have been able to do the job?

Let’s go back to the car.

How Potential is Different from Proven Results

What if the car salesman said, “Based on extensive research, this car has been tested and proven to achieve an average of 27.3 MPG.” Now we have a match. Now we know that the car has been tested and proven to meet our criteria!

So while a resume tells us they have the potential to be successful, the KPI gives us precise measurement tools to use as we test the candidate during the interview process and prove the results when we verify them during reference checks. We want to be assured they have been successful in the past and can do so again at your company.

To learn about Recruiting for Soft Skills, read this blog.